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Poetique Electronique, Addictive, Haunting Melodies and Vocals

Poetique Electronique are a musical duo who live and work in Paris and Vienna, both already working in the music industry they work both collaboratively and apart.
Once you listen to the poetic sounds of Poetique Electronique, the addictive and haunting melodies and vocals will echo in your ears and take you on a pleasant journey. The authors of ‘Irregular Heartbeat’ and ‘Synchronized Motion’, invite us to their world of music and inspiration.

Take a seat, listen and … fall in love with their sound.


"It helped to realize that there is no such thing as perfection. It's the rough edges that make something interesting." Poetique Electronique

ABOUT POETIQUE ELECTRONIQUE

CM: What did you study and where are you currently based?
Ben: At the moment I live in Paris at my friends’ place. I’m planning to travel around Vienna for a couple of months to work on a Live Set with Moe.
Moe: My origins are in Munich, this is where my family lives. But right now I live in Vienna.
Ben: I studied at the University of Vienna and the Sorbonne 3 in Paris, with a Major in Film and Media Studies.
Moe: I also did my BA in Film and Media Studies at the University of Vienna. That’s actually where Ben and I got to know each other.

CM: What is your profession, apart from the band of course?
Moe: I work as a music editor at a magazine. Besides that I also work as a DJ in Munich. Whenever time allows, I work on my solo stuff. But at the moment I have my main focus on Poetique Electronique.
Ben: Right now I am trying to do nothing but music/image videos and music. I’m releasing my first solo-album, which I’ve been working on for almost four years now. I am also working on building up my own label, which will be called “Auris”, which is supposed to work as a platform for young artists, not necessarily musicians, who don’t really know what to do with their creativity.

CM: How did you become professional musicians?
Ben: I wouldn’t consider us professional musicians. We can’t make a living out of it. Nevertheless we invest hundreds of hours in our music. In my case it’s that I just can't not make music, I guess. So I am trying to make this my profession.

CREATIVE PROCESS

CM: What is your ideal work environment to make music, where and how do you work?
Ben: I spent last summer in a tiny hut in the Alps to finish my solo-album. I think this is the perfect work environment for me. Get up, go hiking and then work for 12 hours straight. And when I felt depressed, I would just step outside and see the most beautiful view ever. That always helped to get me out of a hole. I prefer to work with Logic Studio. It works for me. Usually I play a Fender Telecaster on a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe.
Moe: I love working on our music in unusual places. On the train, a café or during a course at university, that’s were I get inspired. In the last couple of years I put up a small home studio. I started to work with Ableton live, but when Ben and I started making music together, I also switched to Logic, that’s just easier because we’re constantly exchanging project files.

CM: How diverse! Can you tell us a bit about your creative process?
Ben: I think that depends. I can’t follow back the traces to my sources of inspiration. I always carry a notebook with me, I love to sit in coffee shops and just watch people, take notes and write down ideas. Graphic genius Sagmeister said something like: “Keeping a journal helps developing your personality” or so. I think he’s right.
The best things I write are when I travel. But then I just have to sit down and bring it into shape. With PÉ most of the time the process looks like this, Moe starts a song and sends me the project file, I try to figure out the vocals, go through my archives of lyrics, that’s how Bruce Springsteen does it too, I hear and see what fits, and what I want the song to be about. The project is then sent back and forth and with time it becomes more concrete. I think we work best, when we’re not in the same city. That way the both of us have the time we need to add our part.

CM: How do you know when a track is finished? Is there a certain point when you just know?
We have both learnt that a production is never 100% finished, but then perfection is nothing that we want to achieve. It helped to realize that there is no such thing as perfection.
It’s the rough edges that make something interesting. We just set an end point and this is very satisfying. Just because you keep working on something doesn’t necessarily mean it’s getting better. Sometimes you just screw it up and a song loses its pureness.

CREATIVE LIFE

CM: What would you say were your biggest achievements so far?
Ben: A friend of mine told me he had sex to my record and thought it was fantastic. If babies get born because
I do music, what more could I ask for? That’s why I admire Marvin Gaye. Sexy music.
Moe: My biggest achievement so far is positive feedback I receive from friends or even people I don’t know.
When people tell us how much they like our music, and that even their parents love the sound, we are motivated to go on with what we’re doing! And the best thing is, when other musicians like and play our songs -
like on the radio, or in DJ-sets or mixes.

CM: What are your biggest challenges in making music?
Ben & Moe: Not doing good enough or just average. There is no space for what you do, because the idea of what you create didn’t exist until you’ve created it. So there is a lack of expectation at the beginning. At the same time you have to be f...ing incredible to make it as a professional musician.

CM: And when you want to get away from it all?
Ben: Just hop on a train.

CM: What inspires your creativity the most about living in Paris and in Vienna?
Ben &, Ben: In Paris that would be a walk through the streets of the 11th and 20th district. Just try to grasp the speed of life.
Moe: The winters are very cold here in Vienna, that’s why I like to spend my time sitting in coffee shops and watching people.

CM: Where do you draw your creativity from other than other music, do you have any favourite blogs or magazines?
Moe: I work for Austrian music magazines as a writer and editor. My brother is a gallerist, which means we have a lot of interesting people around us. We’re trying to do a couple of collaborations in the nearer future.
And Ben is trying to start a Label right now with ‘Auris’. We’ll see how that goes. There are so many blogs and magazines all over the world. German magazines Spex, XLR8R and Der Greif are definitely worth reading.

CM: Do you work ever in cafes?
Ben & Moe: All the time.

CM: What are your favourite festivals?
Melt Festival, near Berlin, is great, I would love to play at it. Les Inrockuptibles in Paris and Field Day in London are also particular favourites.

CM: Is there anyone out there you would like to collaborate with in the future?
Ben: I would love to work with Jamie Lidell one day. And this might sound cheesy, but a duet with Feist at some point. Haha.
Moe: For me as a DJ and electronic music producer I’d like to work with a lot of producers. Poetique Electronique collaborations with artists like Four Tet or Caribou would be amazing! At the moment some producers are doing remixes of our tracks. We are really excited about that.

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