Atelier Gustavolins
Atelier Gustavolins

Atelier Gustavolins

Gustavo Lins fashion detais--Creative-Mapping
Gustavo Lins fashion detais--Creative-Mapping

Gustavo Lins fashion detais--Creative-Mapping

Atelier Gustavolins
Atelier Gustavolins

Atelier Gustavolins

Gustavo-Lins-details-Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-details-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-details-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-fashion- designer-Paris-Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-fashion- designer-Paris-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-fashion- designer-Paris-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-photos-des-details-du-defile-atelier-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-photos-des-details-du-defile-atelier-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-photos-des-details-du-defile-atelier-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-show-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Paris--Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-show-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Paris--Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-show-haute-couture-automne-hiver-2013-2014-Paris--Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-the-cross-Creative-Mapping
Gustavo-Lins-the-cross-Creative-Mapping

Gustavo-Lins-the-cross-Creative-Mapping

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Gustavo Lins, Architect Turned Fashion Designer

After completing his master in architecture, fashion designer Gustavo Lins moved on to design as a freelance pattern maker and has since worked for legendary houses such as John Galliano, Louis Vuitton, Kenzo and Jean Paul Gaultier before going on to found his own ready-to-wear line l'Atelier Gustavolins in 2003. It is in the ateliers of couture’s greatest legends where Gustavo Lins, architect turned fashion designer, gained knowledge of tailoring, cut and an appreciation for fine fabrics that he has carried into his own creations. Looking to Japanese culture and architecture as his muse, Lins breaths life into the rigid man-made structures from which he draws inspiration and renders them into the fluid silhouettes which flow around the contours of the body with a grace and animation that is reflective of Lin’s signature style.

Gustavo Lins seeks to liberate us from the established order of fashion with designs that weigh ripe with contradiction. Gustavo Lins women’s wear collections are at once constructed with a sharp tailoring and cut, bringing to mind the delicate minimalism of a kimono combined with the strength of armour; all the while maintaining with the utmost respect, the soft physicality and seduction of the female form. His menswear designs, whose structured yet corporeal silhouettes and origami-like folds drape the body in manner which evokes the image of a samurai warrior lost among the French aristocratic elite. Few designers have managed to create menswear that is both wearable for any occasion from day to night, but which also stands out with a uniqueness and sophistication that does not sacrifice its masculinity or strength.

"I am inspired by Japan because first of all it is a marvellous culture. They can be very simple and sophisticated at the same time. They are really spiritual people. They know how to live together." Gustavo Lins

Although two seemingly disparate fields, fashion and architecture are in fact deeply engrained in the same essential principles. To approach fashion design with the eye of an architect, for whom structure and form are paramount, is a vantage point which sets Gustavo Lins apart. For Lins, the body is a canvas onto which his fabric-formed architectural creations are built. After all, both fashion and architecture are extensions of ourselves. They are a way with which we interact with the world, whether they take the form of a physical space or designs which enrobe and shield the body. In Lin’s case, they are designs of an art form so elevated as to rival the beauty of even the most impressive architectural constructions.

"I am a Brazilian guy who has lived in Europe for twenty-seven years. I studied architecture in Brazil. Suddenly, I discovered I was fascinated by garments and fashion design. After I finished my architectural background, I began to study pattern making, tailoring and the techniques of cutting and assembling. My father was a surgeon and he suggested that I study anatomy to understand how my body was composed. The first thing I did was to compare the patterns of jackets and the design of my muscles so that I could know how the muscles are connected among themselves in spiral lines.

In front of my house when I was a child was an Oscar Niemeyer building with curves in the space. Every morning when I woke up, I had this marvelous building in the frame of the window. Black and white, very graphic, very fifties, and waves floating into space. In the creative process, synthesis is something very immediate. Within the a fraction of a second is the synthesis of your thought and your being.

The body. The human body because when you are in a space, the limit between your body and the wall are garments. I like to place attention on the first limit around the body. I have insight into study about Japanese architecture, and the base of Japanese architecture is the tatami. When you observe a tatami, it is very close to a kimono. I did a thesis in Spain where I studied the connection between the measurements of a tatami and a kimono, and I discovered a square module. From that I built my label. I put a square, and I fold it to hide my name in my label.

I am inspired by Japan because first of all it is a marvellous culture. They can be very simple and sophisticated at the same time. They are really spiritual people. They know how to live together. Thinking to your neighbour and the limits between you and me. Their lines are perfect because they really know how to build the space with straight lines and curves, so they are the masters in terms of lights and colors.

I discovered the way the Japanese people work. The culture is marvellous; it is very beautiful. The contact between nature and architecture and the way Japanese people explore lights and shadows. There is a reason behind this as well.  Brazilian Indians came from the north of Japan many years ago. So you have the same DNA. Our conscious is almost the same. I have had some dreams last year and I could really see myself living in Japan. I come from an Indian family. My great, great grandmothers were Indian women. So these people were connected to the Japanese people many years ago, and that is a physical reason. The other is a question of personal taste. I like the Japanese, I feel comfortable with them, I like their lives. I don’t try to be Japanese because I am one hundred per cent Brazilian who lives in Paris. I am sort of melted from East and West, and for me Paris is the middle point.

This year I was in Japan for two weeks and I had the chance to visit Naoshima and I saw a Tadao Ando museum and Benesse, so I could really understand the question between Zen temples, Buddhist temples and Ados Tadao architecture. The concrete in the middle of the nature. The way the lights project and create shadows. Very graphic. Very simple. The concrete is very soft and sensual, and he is a master of this. This collection is a little bit inspired by travel in Japan because the prints were inspired by the shadows on the wall. The grey colours; the soft grey is the way the lights project onto the concrete and it gives a very soft grey and orange light. This is an orange I bought in Japan. I had an old kimono, and I used the same orange in the kimono within the collection.

Two weeks ago I was in Mexico, and I visited [Ando Tado’s] house in Mexico City, which was in the middle of a tropical garden. It is super sophisticated. It is rough on one side and very sophisticated on the other side, and the volumes of his sculptures are really very beautiful.

Architecture is a strong reference for me, but I like my clothes very soft, sensual and they must move around the body. I myself do not like very rigid things. I think clothes are supposed to follow the movements of the body and not constrain it."

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