2300KFDPRW=0.00 GW=0.00 BW=0.00 RB=9.99 GB=9.99 BB=9.99Topaz2
2300KFDPRW=0.00 GW=0.00 BW=0.00 RB=9.99 GB=9.99 BB=9.99Topaz2

2300KFDPRW=0.00 GW=0.00 BW=0.00 RB=9.99 GB=9.99 BB=9.99Topaz2

2300KFDPRW=0.00 GW=0.00 BW=0.00 RB=9.99 GB=9.99 BB=9.99Topaz2
Categories: Blog

creativemapping-combat-des-amis-avec-pierres-1976-c-malick-sidibe-courtesy-galerie-magnin-a-paris
creativemapping-combat-des-amis-avec-pierres-1976-c-malick-sidibe-courtesy-galerie-magnin-a-paris

creativemapping-combat-des-amis-avec-pierres-1976-c-malick-sidibe-courtesy-galerie-magnin-a-paris

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-1
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-1

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-1

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-2
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-2

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-2

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-3
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-3

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-3

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-4
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-4

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-4

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-5
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-5

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping-5

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping
malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping

malick-sidibe-the-eye-of-modern-mali-somerset-creativemapping

SHARE: Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponshare on TumblrGoogle+Share on RedditEmail to someone

Curator Philippe Boutté on Malick Sidibé

After discovering the breadth of late Malian photographer, Malick Sidibé's work at Somerset House during London's annual 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair, we had the opportunity to speak to the show's curator Philippe Boutté, director of Paris's Galerie Magnin-A. The gallery was founded in 2009 by André Magnin, an expert in modern African Art, and who has brought this incredibly rich and often overlooked area of art into western cultural institutions. Boutté has worked closely with Magnin through the years, showcasing non-western artists, particularly African, bringing their work into a new geographical light in some of the most renowned art institutions around the world. One of their most important of which is Malick Sidibé, iconic Malian photographer who captured the Malian revolution through the lens of youth culture in the country's capital, Bamako, at the dawn of independence; an independence which coincided with the arrival of rocknroll, newfound freedoms, and a resurgence of youthful energy and life.

We spoke with Philippe Boutté during the opening night of 1:54 at Somerset House in London to discuss Sidibé's work, his personal relationship with the artist, how the curation was staged, and what significance Sibidé's legacy takes on within the wider realm of culture and photography today...
 

"These photographs from the 1960’s are a testimony of a period in Malian history little known to the rest of the world. They show a proud, optimistic, energetic, positive and joyful Africa. An image far removed from the clichés one could have towards this continent." Philippe Boutté

 

CM: What is your background in art? How did you come to direct Galerie Magnin-A?
I began working with André Magnin in 1996 during the collection of Jean Pigozzi: the Contemporary African Art Collection. This unique and unusual collection was the first to focus on artists living and working in Africa. I started off as the assistant of André Magnin, the artistic director of the collection, who spent half of his life in Africa. Then the collection began to expand. We participated in hundreds of exhibitions while simultanesouly presenting them in established institutions such as the Museum of Fine Art, Houston, The Smithsonian in Washington, the Guggenheim Bilbao, The Agnelli Fondation in Turin… and I directed the entirety of the affairs of the collection.

By 2009, we had realised or participated in more than 300 exhibitions, but despite our efforts, the art world was not always interested in the artists we were representing. And it was by participating in the emergence of this movement, to defend the artists that we love and to present them in the most renowned exhibitions halls round the world that André and I decided to leave the C.A.A.C–The Pigozzi Collection–to become sellers.

CM: Why did you choose Malick Sibidé for your latest curation?
Touria El Glaoui, the founder of 1:54, suggested to me at the beginning of the year that we present an exhibition of our artists at Somerset House. Malick had just passed away, and we naturally wanted to pay homage to this great photographer who had just left us. Subsequently, we discovered that Malick Sidibé, who had exhibited on all the continents and had received the most prestigious awards, had never shown in a British institution, it seemed improbable that it would happen but it has now been realised.

CM: What approach did you take in curating his photographs?
Malick Sidibé’s work is very important, and is made up of hundreds of thousands of negatives. He captured youth at the brink of independence by accompanying them into parties, weekends spent on the banks of the Niger. They found themselves at the sides of the river on Sundays to elongate the nighttime, picnicking and playing around. He was also a studio photographer, known and adored throughout Bamako. These three periods, these three themes, are presented in this exhibition across three successive rooms. Instead of curating a a typical exhibition, we wanted to present the prints with titles written in Malick's own handwritting.

CM: What cultural and art-world significance does his work have today?
Malick was an incredible ambassador of African culture and photography. He became a photographer by chance, before which he was a respected designer having studied applied arts in Bamako. But he always destined to be an artist. Each and every one of his photographs, whether they came from his studio or outside, expressed Malick's soul. These photographs from the 1960’s are a testimony of a period in Malian history little known to the rest of the world. They show a proud, optimistic, energetic, positive and joyful Africa. An image far removed from the clichés one could have towards this continent.
Malick Sidibé was admired by his peers. He was the first African photographer to be awarded the Hasselblad Grand Prize, and the first African artist to receive the Lion d’Or de la Biennale de Venise, l’ICP Award. And countless young photographers in Africa and elsewhere are the product of his legacy, influenced by his work.

CM: What did you discover about Sibidé during your curation of the exhibition that surprised or fascinated you?
The depth of Malick's soul. He was an enormous humanist. Shy yet curious, always observing. He was filled with generosity. He brought goodness with him.

CM: Your favourite Sibidé photograph?
One has to mention Nuit de Noël, which is universally iconic. It is the image of love. I also like Combat des Amis avec Pierre, this photo was taken ten years after Nuit de Noël and is surprisingly its “mirror image.” The couple isn’t dressed elegantly, but in swimsuits. Both photographs are taken outside, but one is under the sun, bathed in sunlight, while the other was captured in the privacy of night. On the beach, the two youths do not dance in the same rhythm but face each other with their hands menacingly holding stones in their hands. The image of love in one, and that of mistrust in the other.

CM: Did you have a chance to meet him?
Of course. The first time I met Sidibé was in 1996. He had just showed at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, in his first major solo exhibition, and as a result, I worked with André Magnin on the publishing of his book with Editions Scalo. We then worked together to showcase his photographs in dozens of festivals and exhibitions and to develop relationships with renowned galleries to market his photographs. So I had the chance to work with him for 20 years between Paris and Bamako.

CM: Anything else you would like our readers to know?
We are currently working on a big Malick Sidibé exhibition set for the end of 2017. It is a true retrospective which allows us to shed light on his incredible work and will be accompanied by a monographic catalogue book.

---

CM: Pouvez-vous nous parler de votre historique dans le monde d'art? Comment en êtes-vous arrivé à diriger la Galerie Magnin-A?
J’ai commencé a travailler avec André Magnin en 1996 au sein de la collection de Jean Pigozzi : la Contemporary African Art Collection. Cette collection unique et atypique est la première à s’être focalisée sur les artistes vivants et travaillant en Afrique. J’ai tout d’abord été l’assistant d’André Magnin, le directeur artistique de la collection, qui passait la moitié de sa vie en Afrique. Puis la collection s’est agrandie et son activité avec elle. Nous avons participé à des centaines d’expositions et en parallèle nous présentions la collection dans des grandes institutions : le Museum of Fine Art de Houston, le Smithsonian à Washington, le Guggenheim Bilbao, la Fondation Agnelli à Turin… et je gérais l’ensemble des activités de la Collection.
En 2009 nous avions réalisé ou participé à plus de 300 expositions mais malgré tous nos efforts le marché ne s’intéressait toujours pas aux artistes que nous défendions. C’est pour participer à l’émergence de ce marché, pour défendre les artistes que nous aimons et les présenter sur les grandes foires internationales qu’André et moi avons quitté la C.A.AC.-The Pigozzi Collection pour devenir marchands.

CM: Pourquoi avoir choisi Malick Sibidé lors de votre dernière exposition?
Touria El Glaoui, Fondatrice de la célèbre foire 1:54 qui se tient tous les ans en octobre à Londres, m’a proposé au début de cette année de présenter à Somerset House une exposition d’un de nos artistes. Malick venait de nous quitter et tout naturellement l’idée s’est imposée de rendre hommage à ce grand photographe qui venait de disparaître. Par la suite nous avons réalisé que Malick Sidibé qui avait été exposé sur tous les continents, reçu les prix les plus prestigieux n’avait jamais été présenté dans une institution anglaise. C’était improbable et c’est désormais réparé.


CM: Pourquoi avoir représenté son oeuvre de cette manière?
L’oeuvre de Malick Sidibé est très importante, son fonds est composé de centaines de milliers de négatifs. Il a photographié la jeunesse à l’aube de l’indépendance en accompagnant les groupes dans les soirées et les weekend au bord du fleuve Niger. Ils se retrouvaient au bord du fleuve le dimanche pour prolonger la soirée, pique-niquer et jouer. C’était aussi un photographe de studio, populaire et connu du tout Bamako. Ces trois périodes, ces trois thèmes sont présentés dans cette exposition, dans trois salles successives. Nous souhaitions au lieu d’exposer des tirages d’exposition, présenter des tirages avec les titres écrits de la main de Malick.

CM: Que pensez vous que son travail apporte dans le monde de la culture et de l'art?
  Malick était un formidable ambassadeur de la culture et de la photographie africaine. Malick est arrivé à la photographie par hasard mais il était un dessinateur remarqué qui avait étudié les arts appliqués à Bamako. Et il a toujours eu conscience d’être un artiste. Dans chacune de ces photographies, qu’elle soit de studio ou de reportage, transparaît l’âme de Malick. Ces photographies des années 60 sont un témoignage historique sur une période du Mali mal connue de l’Occident. Elles montrent une Afrique fière, optimiste, énergique, positive et joyeuse. Une image très éloignée des clichés que l’on peut avoir du continent. 
Malick Sidibé a été reconnu par ses pairs. Il a été le premier photographe africain à obtenir le Grand Prix Hasselblad, le premier artiste africain à recevoir le Lion d’Or de la Biennale de Venise, l’ICP Award. Et de nombreux jeunes photographes en Afrique ou ailleurs se disent héritiers de son œuvre, reconnaissent son influence sur leur travail.

CM: Pendant cette collaboration, avez vous decouvert quelque chose de surprenant ou de fascinant à propos de Sibidé?
 La grandeur d’âme de Malick C’était un grand humaniste. Timide mais curieux et observateur. Il était d’une très grande générosité. Il faisait le bien autour de lui.


CM: Votre image préferée?
Bien entendu on ne peut éviter la Nuit de Noël qui est une icône universelle. C’est l’image de l’Amour. Tout est là. J’aime beaucoup également le Combat des Amis avec Pierre, cette photo a été prise 10 ans après Nuit de Noël et est surprenamment  son « «image miroir ». Le couple n’est pas habillée élégamment mais en maillot de bain. Les deux photos sont prises en extérieur mais l’une est sous le soleil, baigné de lumière, l’autre dans l’intimité de la nuit. Sur la plage les deux jeunes ne dansent pas dans le même rythme front contre front mais se font face l’air menaçant des pierres à la main. L’image de l’Amour pour l’une, l’image de la défiance pour l’autre.


CM: Avez vous eu la chance de le rencontrer?
Bien entendu. La première fois que j’ai rencontré Malick c’était en 1996 il venait d’être présentée à la Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain dans sa première grande exposition solo et j’ai de suite travaillé avec André Magnin pour la réalisation de son livre monographique aux Editions Scalo. Nous avons par la suite travaillé ensemble pour montrer ses photographies dans des dizaines de festivals et d’expositions et développer en partenariat avec des galeries de renom la commercialisation de ses photographies. J’ai donc eu la chance de travailler avec lui pendant 20 ans entre Paris et Bamako.


CM: Quelque chose d'autre à partager a nos lecteurs?
Nous travaillons actuellement à une grande exposition  de Malick Sidibé pour la fin de l’année 2017.  Une vraie rétrospective qui permettra de mettre en lumière son magnifique travail et qui sera accompagné d’un important catalogue livre monographique.

 
 
Photo © Galerie Magnin-A
All Rights Reserved © Creative Mapping
 
 
 

Loading...